CHASSIS MODELS (Archives)

A collection of scratch-built, 1:43-scale, super-detailed chassis of classic sports-racing cars

Maserati 450S Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model

Shown here are Pierre Laugier’s collection of scratch-built, 1:43-scale, super-detailed chassis of classic sports-racing cars. This project was a new departure for him and was in development for almost a year prior to its first presentation at Retromobile in Paris in February 2008.

The idea behind the concept came about from a realization that many collectors want the pleasure of viewing the uninterrupted lines and shape of their models, but also want the pleasure of viewing the chassis and internal workings of the car. However, the two pleasures cannot be united in the one model car without sacrifice. Therefore, why not try to give the collector both. This realization lead Pierre to build a number of scratch-built, highly-detailed chassis models, which are ideal for displaying alongside a complete model of the same car and would particularly complement a model from an existing collection.

The Building of the Chassis Model 
Like all models by Pierre Laugier, attention to detail and craftsmanship are paramount, so the building of the model could not begin until there had been extensive research on the original car, in particular detailed study of historical documents such as photographs, drawings and blueprints, together with testimony from those involved in the car’s original development and production, as well as present-day restoration.

Afterwards an accurate plan of the chassis was drawn up in 1:43 scale. The intention was to try and follow a process as close as possible to building the real car.

The next step was the chassis frame, which was hand-made from scratch by soldering together various lengths of fine-diameter tubular brass. The parts of the chassis were then bolted together using hand-made nuts and bolts in sizes ranging from 0.3 to 0.5.

The cockpit and fuel tanks were then moulded from 0.1mm aluminium sheeting. Except for the engine, radiator and tanks, which were cast from prototypes made by Pierre, each part was individually made, from the suspension, gearbox and shock absorbers, to the smallest connection.

With so much of the model being individually hand-made, each chassis had its own unique identity.

Finally, Pierre believes that there is beauty in a race car that has seen some competition, so using oil-paints to achieve the desired effects, the exhaust pipe proudly displays its heat history, and the seats show evidence of contact with the driver after a hard-fought race.

The Finished Chassis Model 
Each chassis is best appreciated alongside a model of the complete car, either from an existing collection, or one made especially by Pierre. The collector thereby gets the pleasure of viewing the unbroken lines of the closed model whilst at the same time admiring its chassis, gearbox, transmission… all the little details of the internal workings of the car.

 

Nevertheless, each chassis can be displayed by itself and enjoyed for its own merits, and because each one is individually made to order, the choice of how each model is displayed is down to the collector.

All the chassis models featured here are no longer available.

 
Ferrari 250 TR58 Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model of the Ferrari 250 TR58

Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model of the

Ferrari 250 TR58, Winner of Le Mans 1958

Ferrari built a number of 250 TR58s for the 1958 World Sportscar Championship, and these cars secured them the constructors title by winning four out of the six races, including Le Mans for the third time.

The TR58 that won Le Mans was chassis #0728TR, #14. It was driven by Phill Hill and Olivier Gendebien and the victory was certainly merited as the nearest competition was 12 laps or 160 kms behind at the finish.

Shown here is the chassis model of #0728TR. Also shown are two different one-off displays which include a built model and a ’bodybuck’ model with the chassis model. The three-model display was made as a special presentation to commemorate the 50th anniversary in 2008 of the TR58’s win at Le Mans, and it was exhibited at the 2008 Le Mans Classic event. The four-model display includes both a wire and a ’wood’ ’bodybuck’ model and was a special commission. *

The chassis model is no longer available, but the 'wood' 'bodybuck' model is still available to order.  Please click on this link for more information: Ferrari 250 TR58 'Wood' 'Bodybuck' Model.

A single built model version can also still be viewed in the Archive Gallery by clicking on this link Ferrari 250 TR58 Built Model.

 

'Wood' and wire ’bodybuck’ models of the TR58 are available to order, as is a two-model display.  Further details can be found by clicking on the different links: 

Ferrari 250 TR58 Wire ’Bodybuck’ Model

Ferrari 250 TR58 'Bodybuck' Model Display

* NB. These particular displays are no longer available. Please enquire as to the availability of other similar displays.

 
Ferrari 166 MM Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model of the

Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model of the Ferrari 166 MM, Winner of Le Mans 1949

This chassis model is of Ferrari’s first ever winner at Le Mans, and the car that ensured Ferrari’s iconic status. The 166 MM #22 (chassis #0008M) was driven by Peter Mitchell Thomson (Lord Selsdon) and his co-driver Luigi Chinetti, although the Italian drove for the vast majority of the race.

This 166 MM featured unique ‘Superleggera’ lightweight alloy bodywork fitted directly onto a small-diameter, tubular metal frame attached to the chassis. The frame & chassis for the model have been recreated using 0.5mm, 0.8mm and 1.0mm brass tube. Brass has also been used to make the louvred panels, the wishbone suspension and the transverse and axle leaf springs.

The scale model of the Colombo V12 engine has been scratch-built, as has the carburetor air-intake, which has been made from aluminium. Aluminium has also been used to make the various reservoirs. The radiator and gearbox have also been made from scratch, and the seats have been hand-painted.

The finished model was presented for the first time at Retromobile 2009, together with a ’bodybuck’ model to accompany it, as shown. Information about the ’bodybuck’ model can be found in the Archive Gallery by clicking on this link: Ferrari 166 MM ’Bodybuck’ Model.  Both the chassis model and ’bodybuck’ model are no longer available.

 
Maserati 450S Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model

Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model of the Maserati 450S, Engine Tipo 54, 1956-1958

This chassis model was completed in May 2008 after two and half months of work.

Like the other chassis models from LP Creation, the intention was to build a scratch-built chassis as close as possible to the original, using a variety of techniques. The original 450S chassis was designed by Colotti for Maserati, with a multi-tube construction on two levels. This design presents a number of difficulties, not least the use of oval, rather than circular, tubing.

The complexity of the real chassis presented an opportunity to add a greater level of detail than before, from the gearbox and the suspension, to the carburettor and throttle linkage system.

Maserati built nine versions of the 450S between 1956-1958, with the intention of competing in, and winning, the World Sportscar Championship. However, the car failed in its bid to secure overall victory for Maserati, despite the efforts of many of the leading drivers of the day and a win at the 1957 12 Hours of Sebring. Nevertheless the car did enjoy a number of later successes with privateers, notably in the US.

The chassis model was exhibited for the first time at Le Mans Classic in July 2008 in a display with a wire 'bodybuck' model as shown here.  Further photos of the 'bodybuck' model can be found in the Archive Gallery by clicking on this link: Wire Maserati 450S ’Bodybuck’ Model.  Both the chassis model and 'bodybuck' model are no longer available.

 
Ferrari 340 Mexico Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model

Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model of the Ferrari 340 Mexico from the Carrera Panamericana, 1952-1953

The chassis of the 340 Mexico was built from scratch using parts that were each specifically made for the model.  The construction of the chassis began with the cutting and soldering together of fine tubular brass, measured to scale from a plan drawn up by LP Creation.

Ferrari built four 340 Mexicos to race at the Carrera Panamericana in 1952. Only three of them ended up competing, and only one, entered by Industrias 1-2-3 and driven by Luigi Chinetti and Jean Lucas, finished the race, coming 3rd. One of the four cars then went on to compete at the 1953 race, driven by Phil Hill and Richie Ginther, but that too did not manage to finish the race.


This model was first presented at Retromobile 2008 and is no longer available.

 
Ferrari 500 Mondial Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model

Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model of the Ferrari 500 Mondial, 1953-1954

The 500 Mondial was launched to commemorate Ferrari’s success in the 1953 World Sportscar Championship. It first raced at the 12 Hours of Casablanca in December 1953 driven by Ascari and Villoresi, coming second. The car went into production in 1954 and was produced with bodies by both Scaglietti and Pinin Farina. The car enjoyed considerable success and contributed enormously to Ferrari’s retention of the 1954 World Sportscar Championship title.

Like all of LP Creation’s chassis models, it was built from scratch using a combination of individually made parts, such as the tubular frame and the de Dion suspension, together with a number of parts cast from prototypes made by LP Creation.

This chassis is displayed with LookSmart’s version of the Berlinetta from the 1954 Tour de France driven by Dustaritz and Fayen.

The chassis model was first presented at Retromobile 2008 and is no longer available.

 
Ferrari 250 TR61 Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model

Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model of the Ferrari 250 TR61, Winner of Le Mans 1961

The chassis of the TR61 #0794TR was one of the first chassis models to be built by LP Creation.

Scuderia Ferrari entered this TR61 at Le Mans 1961 with drivers Olivier Gendebien and Phil Hill, who went on to victory setting a new race record.

This chassis model was built from scratch like all of LP Creation’s chassis models, with a combination of parts that were individually made, such as the frame which was soldered from fine brass tubing, together with a number of parts cast from prototypes made by LP Creation, such as the engine. However, unlike some other chassis, this ’multi-tube’ design required a more complex build due to its upper and lower two-level structure.

The chassis model was first presented at Retromobile 2008. It is displayed here with LP Creation’s fine-detailed model of the TR61 #0794TR. You can find more information and pictures of this model in the Archive Gallery by clicking on this link: Ferrari 250 TR61.  Note that neither the chassis model nor the built model are now available.

 
Lancia D20 Coupe Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model

Scratch-built, 1:43-Scale, Super-detailed Chassis Model of the Lancia D20 Coupe from Le Mans 1953

A D20 had won the 1953 Targa Florio two months earlier, and had finished 3rd in the 1953 Mille Miglia, so with 4 D20s entered in the 1953 Le Mans 24 Hours, Scuderia Lancia’s expectations were justifiably high. Unfortunately those expectations were misplaced as all 4 cars failed to finish, suffering a variety of mechanical problems during the race, although #63 with Gonzales/Biondetti survived until the 21st hour.

This car was the first purpose-built sportscar developed by Lancia for use in competition. Like all the D20s, the version raced at Le Mans used Lancia’s V6 engine, however this was the only race where the engine was modified by a compressor.

The model was built from scratch using brass tube to make the tubular space-frame chassis with its independent all-round suspension. All other parts including the engine were also scratch-built in either metal or resin.

This model was presented for the first time at the Le Mans Classic event in July 2008 and is no longer available.

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